2016 GSK IMPACT Award winners

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Part of GSK IMPACT Awards

Our congratulations to the 10 charities who won 2016 GSK IMPACT Awards for their outstanding contributions to improving health and wellbeing in their communities.

The following organisations received £30,000 unrestricted funding, access to free training and leadership development, and the opportunity to join the prestigious GSK IMPACT Awards Network. The 2016 winners demonstrated excellence across the criteria – including innovation and management – during the fiercely competitive application process, beating more than 400 applicants to the award. The overall winner was Groundswell. 

 

Groundswell

A charity based in Vauxhall, London, that works to enable homeless people to take more control of their lives, have greater influence on statutory services and play a fuller role in the community.

The ethos of Groundswell is to include those who have lived the experience of homelessness in all aspects of its being. Through building trusting relationships and volunteering, it helps people out of homelessness. It also offers a range of peer-led initiatives, including health advocacy, which supports homeless people to receive the health care they need.

What the judges said: 
By putting people touched by homelessness at the centre of its decision-making, Groundswell fully understands their challenges and can respond sensitively and effectively. Its impact is tangible and hugely impressive, responding to the complex needs of homeless people with energy and innovation.

Age UK South Lakeland

A Cumbria-based organisation that works with local older people to help them retain independence and exercise real choice in their lives.

Age UK South Lakeland developed a client risk assessment tool, highlighting areas that may be placing clients at risk of decline towards crisis. Action plans are then agreed and intensive support provided in the community and at GP surgeries. The charity also works with over 26 local partners, provides services across a large rural area and generates 63 per cent of its income.

What the judges said:
An impressive organisation with a clear understanding of the needs of older people in its community. The Compass Assessment Tool ensures its services provide the most effective support. It is a charity that has continued to innovate and demonstrate the effectiveness of its work.

Body & Soul

A London-based national organisation promoting the respect, dignity and wellbeing of children, young people and adults living with and affected by HIV.

Body & Soul provides services for HIV-affected families. Since winning a GSK IMPACT Award in 2011, it has seen significant growth in service users and volunteering, a greater reach through clinical partnerships and remote support programmes, and has developed an impact strategy to evaluate and inform its programmes.

What the judges said: 
Body & Soul has shown significant improvement since it last won a GSK IMPACT Award in 2011. Its work with children and young people with HIV is particularly impressive as is its increased reach. This is a charity meeting a vital need.

Carers in Hertfordshire

A charity supporting unpaid carers across Hertfordshire with information, problem solving and support.

Carers are more likely to suffer from poor health. Carers in Hertfordshire trains staff in GP surgeries to identify and signpost carers to its services, which has led to referral numbers doubling last year. It advocates for carers, helps them plan their caring role, guides them through the minefield of the social care system and is developing Carers' Hubs in 16 locations across the county.

What the judges said:
It is providing vital services that ensure carers are identified and supported, and that people working with carers are aware of their needs. The charity has an energetic team of staff and volunteers who have innovated and influenced local services.

Children North East

A Newcastle-upon-Tyne-based charity aimed at transforming the lives of disadvantaged children in the North East.

Child poverty in Newcastle is worse than the England average, affecting 29.9 per cent of children under the age of 16. Children North East operates out of seven sites on Tyneside and runs a range of health, social care and educational services. Its project ‘Poverty proofing the school day’ has helped schools remove barriers to learning for children in poverty.

What the judges said:
This charity’s holistic approach has real impact, not only working with children but all those people and institutions that affect their lives – parents, schools and public services. Its work ‘Poverty proofing the school day’ is impressive and has the potential to be rolled out across the UK.

Falkirk and District Association of Mental Health

An organisation based in Falkirk, Scotland, that works to promote mental health recovery for adults aged 16 and over.

In Scotland, one in four people will experience a diagnosable mental health problem each year. Falkirk and District Association of Mental Health (FDAMH) provides a range of services including counselling, befriending, family and carer support groups, a mental wellbeing drop-in, educational and social activities and training. It also works in GP surgeries, with patients referred to FDAMH as an alternative to medication.

What the judges said:
This charity achieves impressive results for its service users, which are at the centre of its work. It is run by a team of committed staff and volunteers from the local community who can take pride in this well deserved award.

London Friend

A London-based charity working to improve the health and wellbeing of adult lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people.

LGBT people suffer higher incidence of mental health problems and self harm, low self esteem and confidence. London Friend provides counselling, social support groups, drug and alcohol support and training for health professionals.

What the judges said:
London Friend has led the way in identifying ‘chemsex’ as a health issue and developing solutions. It is one of the oldest LGBT charities in the UK which has continued to evolve over time, responding to the changing needs of its community and services users.

Promoting a More Inclusive Society (PAMIS)

A Scottish charity based in Dundee that aims to improve the lives of people with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD).

People with PMLD often have physical disabilities and many are wheelchair users. PAMIS's digital passport programme supports engagement with family carers and people with PMLD, and the 'Changing Places' campaign ensures people with PMLD can access communities through appropriate toileting and changing facilities.

What the judges said: 
A small charity punching well above its weight. Its digital passport programme and campaigns are impressive, having real impact on the lives of people with learning difficulties and their carers. The provision of adequate public amenities is one great example of its success.

SeeSaw

An Oxfordshire-based organisation responding to the needs of bereaved children and young people.

One in 29 children aged 5-16 in the UK has been bereaved of a parent or sibling. SeeSaw offers pre- and post-bereavement support to young people. It also provides support and training to teaching staff in schools as well as health and statutory professionals who may come into contact with bereaved children and young people.

What the judges said: 
A small charity putting the needs of bereaved children at the heart of the organisation. It works hard to provide appropriate, timely and personalised support when children and their families are most in need. The number of schools it is working in is very impressive.

The Shakespeare Hospice

A Stratford-upon-Avon-based charity supporting adults and young people affected by life-limiting conditions.

The Shakespeare Hospice provides a range of services for patients and their families, including advice and physical, psychological and spiritual care. It offers a 'Hospice at Home' model, including 24-hour care by nursing staff. Its groundbreaking 'Transition Service' supports young people with life-limiting conditions moving from children to adult services.

What the judges said:
A charity providing essential support for people with life-limiting conditions. Its work with young people moving from child to adult services is particularly important and commendable. The organisation is a model of good practice, working in a vital area.