Personalised care in practice: lessons learnt and next steps

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A move to personalised care means people having more control over the care and support they need to improve their own health and wellbeing. Personalised care is based on ‘what matters’ to people, not just what’s the matter with them. 

This event will share the latest practice and learning on personalised care, bringing together people with lived experience, the NHS, local government and the voluntary community sector, to discuss what personalisation means in the context of Covid-19.

With personalisation core to both social care and the NHS Long Term Plan, join us to explore the progress made in creating a new relationship between people, professionals, and the health and care system.

About this event

Conference sessions will: 

  • explore how Covid-19 has highlighted the impact of health inequalities and how personalised care could make a difference
  • share learning on how to develop the knowledge, confidence and skills of the health and care workforce to embed personalised care across the sector
  • showcase examples of how the voluntary and community sector are working with marginalised groups to tailor support to their needs
  • demonstrate what strong leadership aligned with the values underpinning personalised care looks like and how it can help to implement the cultural and system changes needed  
  • provide practical guidance on involving patients in decisions about their care to support the management of multiple long-term conditions and help achieve the best possible outcomes. 

This virtual conference is open for four weeks. The content takes place over four half-days in week two. If you are unable to join all of the sessions, you will have two weeks to catch up on demand.

Speakers include:

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Dan Wellings

Senior Fellow, Policy, The King’s Fund

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Sara Riggare

Patient Leader and PhD student in Selfcare for Parkinson’s Disease, Health Informatics Centre, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

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Professor Alf Collins

Clinical Director, Personalised Care Group, NHS England and NHS Improvement

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Dr Aamena Bharmal

GP Specialist Trainee and Academic Clinical Fellow in Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London and Researcher, Policy, The King’s Fund

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Danny Vadasz

Chief Executive Officer, Health Issues Centre, Melbourne, Australia

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Helen Gilburt

Fellow, Policy, The King’s Fund

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Clenton Farquharson MBE

Chair, Think Local, Act Personal (TLAP)

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Anya de Iongh

East of England Regional Supported Self-Management Mentor, NHS England and MSc Occupational Therapy Student

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Mark Doughty

Senior Consultant, Leadership and Organisational Development, The King's Fund

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Lynne Craven

Patient Leader and Co-Founder, The Self-Management Partnership

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Ethan Williams

Researcher, Policy, The King’s Fund

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Neil Tester

Director, The Richmond Group of Charities

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Imelda Redmond CBE,

National Director, Healthwatch England

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Professor Martin Marshall

Chair, Royal College of General Practitioners, and Chair, Personalised Care Institute

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Dr Rebecca Steinfeld

Head of Policy, National Voices

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Deborah Fenney

Researcher, The King's Fund

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Jake Beech

Researcher, The King’s Fund

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Samira Ben Omar

Assistant Director of Equalities, North West London Collaboration of Clinical Commissioning Groups, and Co-founder, Community Voices Movement for Change

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Dr Ollie Hart

GP Partner, Sloan Medical Centre, Clinical Director, Sheffield Primary Care Network and Clinical Commissioning Lead for Person Centred Care, Sheffield Clinical Commissioning Group

Sponsorship and exhibition

If you’d like a conversation about your business goals, and how being involved in this event can help you, please email Rebecca Gorringe at r.gorringe@kingsfund.org.uk or give her a call on 020 7307 2490. 

Please click here to find out more information.

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Programme

Monday 22 March, 9.30–10.30am

Session one: Personalised care – where are we now?

9.30amWelcome and introduction

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Dan Wellings, Senior Fellow, Policy, The King’s Fund

9.35amWhat does personalised care mean to me?

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Sara Riggare, Patient Leader and PhD student in self-care for Parkinson’s disease, Health Informatics Centre, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

9.50amHow much progress have we made in delivering personalised care?

Hear from our panel about:

  • pre-Covid-19 – personalised care before the Covid-19 pandemic 
  • the impact of Covid-19 on the personalisation agenda 
  • the exacerbation of inequalities during the pandemic and the importance of reaching out and connecting with local communities and people, regardless of background or circumstance
  • the role personalised care can play in the recovery from the pandemic.  

Clenton Farquharson MBE, Chair, Think Local, Act Personal (TLAP) 
Imelda Redmond CBE, National Director, Healthwatch England
Professor Alf Collins, Clinical Director, Personalised Care Group, NHS England and NHS Improvement 
 

10.15amLive Q&A

11.00am– 12.00pm

Session two: What are the challenges and opportunities for personalising care in response to Covid-19?

11.00amWelcome and introduction

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Mark Doughty, Senior Consultant, Leadership and Organisational Development, The King's Fund

11.05amUnderstanding the impact Covid-19 has had on people with significant health needs, the wider public and frontline professionals

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Neil Tester, Chief Executive, The Richmond Group of Charities
  • Findings from the report, How has Covid-19 shaped experiences and views of health and care? published by Britain Thinks and The Richmond Group of Charities, including insights into how the changes to service delivery during the pandemic have landed, and which changes might (or might not) stick. 
  • The multiple conditions guidebook – one year on - lessons on how the pandemic has presented some challenges for people living with multiple long-term conditions.

Additional speaker to be confirmed. 

11.40amLive Q&A

Additional speakers to be confirmed. 

Tuesday 23 March, 9.30–10.30am

Session three: Commissioning for personalised care

9.30amWelcome and introduction

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Jake Beech, Researcher, The King’s Fund

9.35amEngaging people in a deliberative process to explore attitudes to wellbeing

  • Outlining the process – people discussing and deliberating over what they can do for themselves and what they need services for.
  • Understanding how people’s backgrounds, experience and knowledge shape attitudes towards responsibility. 
  • Why commissioners needed to do this work and how it provided a local understanding to shape decision-making.  

Jane Lodge, Associate Director of Patient Involvement, Sussex Clinical Commissioning Groups 
Wendy Blunden, Member, Deliberative Panel, Sussex
Jessie Cunnett, Associate Director, Head of Health and Social Care, Traverse 
 

10.00amWorking collaboratively with local user-led organisations

Laura Gaudion, Interim Director, Adult Social Care and Housing Needs, Isle of Wight Council
  • How Isle of Wight Council has worked with partners to establish a personal assistant market that is well placed to support residents in their own homes and reduce avoidable admissions to care homes.  

10.15amLive Q&A

11.00–11.45am

Session four: Shared decision-making – putting patient involvement into action

This session is sponsored by AbbVie. 

11.00amWelcome and introduction

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Dr Aamena Bharmal, GP Specialist Trainee and Academic Clinical Fellow in Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London, and Researcher, Policy, The King’s Fund

11.05amImplementing shared decision-making in practice

  • Shared decision-making takes a whole-system and collaborative approach, with services integrated around the person. 
  • Health and care practitioners support individuals to make decisions about their own treatment, enabling people to have choice and control over the way their care is planned and delivered, based on ‘what matters’ to them and their individual strengths and needs. 
  • This session explores how different components of shared decision-making are being implemented in practice, from changes to how clinicians are supporting people with long-term conditions, to how organisations and local areas are implementing these approaches on a wider scale.

Professor Matthew Cripps, Director, Covid-19 Behaviour Change Unit, and Director of Sustainable Healthcare, NHS England and NHS Improvement 
Dr Sam Finnikin, GP, and Clinical Fellow for Values and Evidence, Royal College of General Practitioners 
Rachel Power, Chief Executive, Patients Association 
Fiona Olivier, Head of Global Patient Relations, AbbVie 
 

11.45amContinue the conversation with Abbvie at their stand

Wednesday 24 March, 9.30–10.30am

Session five: Skills, knowledge, confidence development for staff

9.30amWelcome and introduction

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Dr Helen Gilburt, Fellow, Policy, The King’s Fund

9.35amSupporting staff to have better conversations with patients around self-management and shared decision-making

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Lynne Craven, Patient Leader, and Co-Founder, The Self-Management Partnership
  • Developing the skills of staff working with low-level activation patients. 

9.50amWhat does training and support for staff in social care look like?

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Oonagh Smyth, Chief Executive, Skills for Care

10.00amProviding evidence-based training at scale

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Professor Martin Marshall, Chair, Royal College of General Practitioners, and Chair, Personalised Care Institute
  • Offering workers from across health and social care access to accredited personalised care training and development.
  • How do we shift the culture from fixer to enabler? 

10.10amLive Q&A

11.00am–12.00pm

Session six: Putting people’s voices at the heart of system change

11.00amWelcome and introduction

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Ethan Williams, Researcher, Policy, The King’s Fund

11.05amCo-production and accelerating the personalisation agenda

This session focuses on how to put people’s voices at the heart of system change as integrated care systems, primary care networks and place-based partnerships emerge and develop across England.

Hear from our panel of local leaders about:

  • the importance of co-production and how the personalisation agenda can be accelerated as these changes are implemented 
  • new ways of measuring and collecting data on how well services are working together and how this can be improved and move on from current methods of measuring user experience in the health and care system that tend to focus on experiences of individual services 
  • learning on how they are developing their own methods of understanding how integration is working for the populations that they serve. 

Julia Ross, Chief Executive, Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire (BNSSG) Clinical Commissioning Group, and Executive Co-lead, BNSSG Integrated Care System 
Samira Ben Omar, Assistant Director of Equalities, North West London Collaboration of Clinical Commissioning Groups, and Co-founder, Community Voices movement for change 
Dr Ollie Hart, GP partner, Sloan Medical Centre; Clinical Director, Sheffield Primary Care Network; and Clinical Commissioning Lead for Person Centred Care, Sheffield Clinical Commissioning Group
Dr Rebecca Steinfeld, Head of Policy, National Voices 

11.40amLive Q&A

Thursday 25 March, 9.30– 10.30am

Session seven: Personalising care for those with the worst health outcomes

9.30amWelcome back and introduction

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Deborah Fenney, Researcher, Policy, The King's Fund

9.35amWorking with groups with the worst health outcomes

The voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector is well placed to help local government and the NHS to build community capacity and peer support, making the most of the assets and knowledge available in local communities, looking for solutions that work for people and their families, and which rely less on health and care services.

Hear from our panel about:

  • how national and local VCSE organisations are trying to personalise what they do and reaching out to those with the worst health outcomes
  • how VCSE organisations are working in partnership with the NHS and local government and reworking their offer during Covid-19 to meet the needs of vulnerable groups. 

Steven Platts, Chief Executive, Groundswell  
Alex Fox OBE, Chief Executive, Shared Lives Plus, member, NHS Assembly, and Vice Chair, Think Local Act Personal 
Megan Lewis, Expert by Experience, and Ambassador, Shared Lives Plus 
 

10.10amLive Q&A

11.00am–12.00pm

Session eight: What could personalised care look like by 2025?

11.00amWelcome back and introduction

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Dr Charlotte Augst, Chief Executive, National Voices

11.05amAn international perspective on personalised care – lessons from Australia

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Danny Vadasz, Chief Executive Officer, Health Issues Centre, Melbourne, Australia

11.15amWhat could personalised care look like by 2025?

In this session hear from our panel about: 

  • where personalised care can go in the future 
  • the potential benefits and challenges of personalised health and care
  • the barriers that could prevent aspirations being realised
  • what they have learnt about personalisation during Covid-19. 

Anya de longh, Patient Leader, East of England Regional Supported Self-Management Mentor, NHS England and NHS Improvement, and MSc Occupational Therapy Student, University of East Anglia 
Neil Tester, Director, The Richmond Group of Charities 
 

11.45amLive Q&A

12.00pmClose of conference

Contact details and FAQs

Booking enquiries

If you’d like to make a booking enquiry, please email Anna at events@kingsfund.org.uk.

Programme enquiries

If you have any queries relating to the event programme please email Louisa at l.cavinato@kingsfund.org.uk.

Sponsorship and exhibition

For sponsorship and exhibition enquiries, please contact Rebecca at r.gorringe@kingsfund.org.uk.

FAQs

High-quality, up-to-date content is delivered to you via an online platform that is open for four weeks. During the first week, you will have the opportunity to log in, test your connection and become familiar with the set-up. The live sessions will take place over four half-days in the second week, giving you the option to catch up on demand until the end of week four.

Virtual conferences mean you can digest content at your own pace and work around a busy schedule. You can pause and rewind presentations and put your questions to our expert speakers. There is a 'main room' for sharing resources and the option of one-to-one networking. Virtual exhibition stands enable you to interact with a range of organisations who will share expertise and information – all at a time that suits you.

  • Before the event, tell your colleagues that you are taking part and block out the time in your diary
  • Make sure you are using an up-to-date web browser on a laptop or desktop. We recommend Google Chrome or Firefox for the best delegate experience.
  • In week one, introduce yourself in the main chat. This is an easy way of ‘getting your voice in the room’, starting conversations and establishing new relationships with colleagues in health and care. 
  • Avoid as many distractions as possible so you can immerse yourself in the sessions as you would at a physical conference. Treat each session as a meeting, put your phone on silent and close down your emails.
  • If you know you won’t be able to watch certain sessions live, you can submit your questions in advance and put aside time in the third or fourth week to catch up on demand.
  • Each session is approximately one hour long and there is always at least a half-an-hour break between sessions so you can take a screen break or catch up on emails.
  • Make the most of the online community by taking part in the live Q&As and opting in to one-to-one networking
  • Make sure you secure time in your diary at some point over the four weeks to visit the exhibition stands, where you will find free resources and can have conversations with experts from across the health and care system.

When the event is taking place, there will be technical support available at all times but it is worth using the extra time before the first session to log in and test your connection, just in case.

Throughout the conference, we will share PDFs of the presentation slides in the lecture theatre, links to resources in the networking area and various materials in the exhibition

The portal is open for four weeks from Monday 15 March to Sunday 11 April, when you will have the opportunity to either watch, save or download these resources. 

Once the platform closes, you will no longer have access to these materials so please ensure you save everything you need beforehand. 

The King's Fund is an independent charitable organisation working to improve health and care in England. Our events are a key source of income, and this income enables us to continue with our charitable objectives

The cost of running a virtual conference is similar to that of a physical event. Although a virtual conference has fewer room hire and catering costs, in order to produce a high-quality event, we still need to pay the costs for the technical supplier, support and developing the platform. With some sessions taking place in our building, we do have to cover some venue costs. We also have a team of dedicated events professionals, content experts, digital, marketing and finance support that work on these events.  

Any profit that is made from these events goes directly towards achieving our strategic priorities. You can find out more about how we are funded here

We offer a number of free bursary places for patients and carers. These places are limited to maintain a balance of voices in the room between patients, service users, carers, and health and care professionals.  To apply for a bursary place please email us a short paragraph explaining why you wish to attend.

When you register for this event, we will ask you to email us at events@kingsfund.org.uk if you have any accessibility requirements. 

Ticket prices

Please note, there is a £20 surcharge to cover the cost of processing invoices. This is an addition to the ticket price and will be added to your invoice. There is no charge for paying by debit or credit card.

  • Public sector, charity or university  £135 + VAT.
  • Small-medium sized enterprise (SME)  £190 + VAT 
  • Commercial/profit-making organisation  £270 + VAT

Student tickets

If you are a student in full-time education, please email us for a promotional code, with a photograph of your valid student ID. Student tickets are £45+VAT.

Bursary tickets

We offer a number of free bursary places for patients and carers. These places are limited to maintain a balance of voices in the room between patients, service users, carers, and health and care professionals.  To apply for a bursary place please email us a short paragraph explaining why you wish to attend.