Applications in home and health care settings

These visions were developed in 2008 to demonstrate how current and future technologies could be deployed for the health sector over the next 10–20 years.

Health applications in the home setting

applications-home-care-settings.jpg

Source: Office of Communications (2008). Report. Health technology scenarios and implications for spectrum: Health Socio-Economic Study; Technology Scenarios Development. The Innovation Company.

  • Home hub and sensors
    The home hub collects and stores information from the sensors. Sensors measure the daily activity of the resident.
  • Video conferencing
    Webcams used by residents to communicate over video with their friends and family (or a health practitioner).
  • Interactive computerised therapy
    Computer packages that provide cognitive behavioural therapy.
  • Visiting doctor’s bag
    A portable device that allows the health practitioner to access the health records of the patient from the NHS spine as well as from their home hub.

Applications in health care settings

applications-in-health-care-settings.jpg

Source: Office of Communications (2008). Report. Health technology scenarios and implications for spectrum: Health Socio-Economic Study; Technology Scenarios Development. The Innovation Company.

  • RFID
    The use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data from a tag attached to an object can supply contextual data about location, time and temperature to track assets, patients, staff and pharmaceuticals.
  • Diagnostic tests at the bedside
    Tests such as blood and urine tests are carried out at the bedside and the results are automatically uploaded to the patient’s record.
  • Clinician PDAs
    A portable device enabling clinicians to access email, patient records, video conferencing etc.
  • Research database
    A database that anonymously aggregates data from patients on a national long-term scale.
  • Remote presence robots
    Robotics that enable doctors to carry out procedures on a patient remotely.
  • Room clean sensors
    Sensors that alert hospital staff if a room hasn’t been cleaned within a certain timeframe.
  • NHS care records
    One electronic repository of health care records, including a summary care record.
  • Ultra stethoscope
    A portable handheld ultrasound that would ultimately replace the stethoscope. Electronic images would enable results to be automatically uploaded to the patient’s record.
  • Vital sign monitoring at the bedside
    Sensors that would transmit vital signs wirelessly to a computer or PDA. Any important changes in the vital signs would sound an alarm.
  • Diagnostic body area networks
    Sensors that are small enough to be swallowed and can then perform diagnostic functions from temperature and biochemical measurements to endoscopy. Data is wirelessly sent to sensors on the body or close to the body.

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